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Nrotc Scholarship Essays

I am applying for the NROTC Scholarship and would like any advice you have to offer on my two essay.

1. Discuss your reasons for wanting to become a Marine Officer.

I desire to become a Marine Officer foremost to serve my country, there is no greater honor than serving your country as a Marine in the Corps. Secondly, becoming a Marine Officer will help me enhance myself both physically and mentally. Finally, it would be a privilege to lead fellow Marines in the Marine Corps as an Officer.

As a child I spent most of my time reading because my family could not afford to buy my siblings and me the commodities other children enjoyed. The majority of the books I read dealt with honor, courage, and loyalty. I have tried to incorporate those values in my everyday life, but I felt that I could not truly do that with the tools I currently had in the civilian world. The military is the only place I could think of to hone those skills, and of the five branches the Marines Corps is the only one that people subsequently associate with possessing those traits. Becoming a Marine Officer would give me the tools that I lack to better myself and be an outstanding member in society.

The Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps would help me attain the superior physical and mental capacity needed to be Marine Officer. Physically, the high standards required to be a Marine Officer would keep me in the utmost physical condition during the four years I will be studying at a university. Mentally, I would be obtaining the knowledge necessary to succeed in the Marine Corps by applying what I learn while attending summer training assignments, as well as the naval science classes each semester, in my Military Occupational Specialty, and as a civilian by earning a degree in political science.

At first, I just wanted to be an enlisted Marine, but then I got the opportunity to apply for this scholarship. It made me want something above the great honor of becoming an enlisted Marine - to become a Marine officer, and love my Marines like my family, to carry an extra pack to lighten their load , to always put them before me, but still always understand that sometimes the mission will call for some of them to get hurt. I want to lead by example.

2. How might your background and experiences enhance the U.S. Marine Corps?

My background and experiences have helped form the individual that I am today, a person that strives to become a Marine Officer. I am certain that my rearing as a child and the skills that I have acquired in my life will enable me to greatly enhance the United States Marine Corps.

When I was eight years old I received an unexpected obligation when older brother left, it was now my responsibility to abide for my younger brother and sister. I did not fully understand the enormity of the task until day my mother, an old fashioned lady from Mexico (this was before people started calling Child Protective Services), gave me a ferocious beating because my little brother had set a spiral notebook on fire in the apartment and explained to me that she would beat the life out of me every time my siblings did something bad, got in trouble at school, or misbehaved in public. She reasoned that I was the one they looked up to so if they were doing something improper, more than likely they picked up from me. From then on I kept a careful watch on how I acted and what I said in front of them, I had to lead them to become better than anything I could ever be.

My responsibility grew even more when my mother was deported and we went to live with our paternal grandmother, who is seventy-one and works full-time at a plant nursery. I learned the meaning of hard work by helping my grandmother with my siblings by cook, clean, do the laundry, and walking to the store for groceries whenever she needed something, in addition to maintaining my grades in school. It was extremely difficult and I would have given up if not for Mrs. Rojas, my college readiness counselor, she helped me stay in school and realize that asking for help is not something to be ashamed of. She always encouraged me and told me that I could go to college if I put my mind to it; it is because of her that I am here now applying for this scholarship and not flipping burgers at Burger King.

I was forced to grow up sooner than my peers and lost most of my childhood, but I do not regret it because when I think of my little sister and how she looks to me for guidance and direction, I know that her need for me to lead and mentor her was far more important than what I missed out on as a child. I look forward to using the skills that I have acquired from my background and experiences to serve my country as a United States Marine Officer.

I probably should have written this a couple months back when many of you were just starting your application. I’m trying to help out my fellow procrastinators get back in the game. Many of the applicants on my list still haven’t submitted everything, so this information may be relevant to more than a few of you.

Got an email from one of my applicants the other day. The applicant was asking about the essay on the Army ROTC scholarship application. He wanted to know how important it was, and what it should say. I would start out by saying that it is certainly not the most important part of the application. Your whole person score and your SAL attributes will carry most of the weight.

Here is what I would suggest you do when you write your essay. By no means is this the official answer, but my thoughts are that this may score you a couple bonus points and get you the slight edge in the process. There are two blocks on the application where you can add narrative input to your submission. These blocks are titled “Applicants Additional SAL Achievements” and “Personal Statement”.

Here is what I would suggest for the first. Take a look at the PMS interview sheet, and make sure you annotate anything on the front side of that sheet that would “check a block”. Highlight anything that has to do with Scholar/Athlete/Leader things you do. If you are weak in one area, don’t lie. Just make sure you are strong in another. Don’t discount things like responsibility at a part time job to show your leadership potential, or an individual sport to highlight your Athletic attributes. Don’t leave anything off the table in this block.

For the essay I suggest you look at three things (Google them):


I’ve linked each of these to the best link I found on Google. Once you have looked at these three topics I feel you have enough information to know what we are looking to instill in an Officer, and what we want in our Cadets. If you sit down and now write your personal statement describing why you want to be an Army Officer, and throw in some statements that sound like your values and beliefs align with the Soldier’s Creed/Warrior Ethos/Army Values/Leadership Dimensions you should have a personal statement that will convince a board member that you have what it takes.

Hope that makes sense…What do you think???

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Filed under: Army ROTC Information, The Scholarship Process | Tagged: Army ROTC, Army Values, Cadet, cadet command, Clarkson, Clarkson Army ROTC, Clarkson University, deadlines, GKB, Golden Knight Battalion, LDP, leadership dimensions, Reserve Officers Training Corp, ROTC, Scholarships, Soldier's Creed |

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