• Home   /  
  • Archive by category "1"

Riotous Living Definition Essay

"Note: this movie is not for my littles," wrote Selena Gomez on her Facebook page recently. Gomez, 20, Disney starlet, singer of songs, breaker of Bieber's heart, is followed by 41 million people on Facebook, the vast majority of whom you'd hope are indeed "littles". She's heavily promoting Spring Breakers on her page, among the fashion line plugs ("My favorites the yellow with the hearts what's yours?") and Disney show ads. But she's right. It's not for them. Spring Breakers is a glorious beast of a film, a morally ambiguous piece of pop art, a lurid trip with hallucinatory highs and ugly comedowns. Substances are abused, humans are murdered. Guns are fellated. In Gomez World, it is very much off-message. Cover your eyes, littles.

Every March, for a week, US college kids descend on a beach resort of their choice and proceed to wreck the place, and themselves. Spring Breakers uses this annual ritual as a springboard into darker territory, filtering the neon debauchery through a fantastical looking-glass, infusing it with dread. Korine – writer of Larry Clark's Kids, director of Gummo and Trash Humpers – began amassing research to make paintings, attracted to the contrast between the violent, sexual content and childlike, poppy colours and images. "There was something hyper-impressionistic and wild about the whole idea of it, and I'd never seen it done in an interesting way," he says, on the phone from his home in Nashville. "Also, just in metaphorical terms, even the phrase 'Spring Break' and what it represents, what it can be, the idea of a destruction of innocence and disappearing into the night."

Korine's "beach noir", as he calls it, involves four girls fleeing to Florida for a spring break blowout, before meeting Alien, a white, cornrowed, teeth-grilled gangsta rapper who takes them under his unscrupulous wing. Korine gifted Alien to James Franco, who immediately agreed to do it, and the director drove to Panama City to write a draft in the midst of authentic spring-break pandemonium. "I checked into Holiday Inn, and I was at ground zero," he says. "It was madness. Kids just destroying shit, fucking in the hallways, setting golf carts on fire, blasting Taylor Swift 24 hours a day. It was cool, but it was really hard to write in that environment. The hotel would just be shaking the whole time, and I couldn't deal with it, so I drove 20 minutes away and checked into a Marriott on a golf course. It was filled with dwarfs. I asked the receptionist and she said Hulk Hogan was filming a reality show. At night I'd go swimming and there would be all these dwarfs sitting at the edge of the pool smoking cigars. It was calm, so I finished writing it there."

Spring Breakers is not a condemnation of a culture, he says. But the film does hold its characters' pop-culture values up for ridicule. These are people who have learned everything they know about the world from MTV. Other than Gomez's questioning Bible student, the girls are spiritually vacant. "Pretend, like, it's a video game," one of them says, before they carry out an armed robbery. Throughout the film, they behave without fear of consequence. Korine says he's interested in the idea that the jump from watching something to doing something can be negligible. But Spring Breakers merely flirts with its themes. There's no moralising, and Korine doesn't care to analyse it too much. He enjoys confusion, he says, and is tired of people expecting there to be a point to everything.

Despite all that, however, Korine is making a clear cultural statement with his casting. Completing Gomez's vixen quartet are Vanessa Hudgens, from Disney's High School Musical films, and Ashley Benson, from teen TV series Pretty Little Liars, as well as Korine's wife, Rachel. "It was the dream, the ultimate dream for me," says Korine. "As I was writing it I thought, 'If you could have the dream, what would it be?' The dream would be these girls and what they represent. There's obviously something very exciting about working with these girls who are, in some ways, in real life, representative of that culture and that pop mythology; and also people who the public can identify as personalities that are complete contrasts to what they're portraying in the film. I love that that part is a conceptual shock on top of the actual film."

'I wanted to see the throes of the kids there just taking over. I wanted to go in and out of rooms and over the balconies … So, yeah, there was like a mile of people at some points'

This is not merely stunt casting – the girls are excellent in the movie – but it's certainly been healthy for publicity (and the US box office), and the idea of Korine as their patriarch is somewhat absurd. This is a guy whose last feature, Trash Humpers, was 80 minutes of old people shagging foliage. There was a surreal moment at the SXSW festival recently, when the Q&A host cajoled the three attendant girls to sing … Baby One More Time (there's a minor Britney theme throughout the film), while Korine giggled and shuffled in his seat, clicking along, looking as bemused as delighted at his current position on the cultural landscape.

He threw them into the production without much of a safety net. They had minimal security ("The absolute littlest amount possible"), and for the early scenes, were surrounded by 1,000 extras who were genuinely on spring break. Hudgens says the spontaneous nudity and sexual antics occurring two feet away freaked her out. "Some gnarly jocks were trying to hump up on the girls," says Korine. "I wanted to see the throes of the kids there just taking over. I wanted to go in and out of rooms and over the balconies and swimming pools, these continuous things, so, yeah, there was like a mile of people at some points. It was hard, it was chaos, it was cool, it was very much like you would imagine it to be. Luckily, on the main strip we found an abandoned hotel that they were gonna destroy, and we spoke to the owner and he just said, 'Go for it.' We set it up and made it active, and basically had everyone destroy it. By the time it was done it looked like bombed-out ruins. It looked like Berlin after the war."

Korine's cameras lap up the young flesh on display, pointedly and lasciviously. It would be fake not to, he says; that's what the film is. In interviews, the girls have defended the fact that they're in bikinis throughout, reasoning that it gives their characters extra vulnerability, which is certainly true; and while the film may not be for Gomez's littles (it's rated 18), they're well aware of it. Many of them turned up to swoon at her at the Hollywood premiere recently. "I think they're really here to see me; I don't think they're here to see the movie," she said.

Many will, though, surely find ways to watch it. Does Korine get a kick out of that? "I don't think little kids should see this film, there's no way that little kids should see this," he says. "But of course, it's exciting to me that there are a lot of things, ideas in the film that a different generation and a different audience than usually see my movies will get a chance to see. That's exciting, it's nice. You always want films to culturally permeate in a way that has an effect."

Spring Breakers is a good few steps removed from reality. There's been much discussion in certain pockets of the internet about the genealogy of Franco's character. Riff Raff, a Houston rapper and friend of Korine's, whom Alien physically resembles, wants to take credit, while Franco (who steals the film) drew substantially from Florida rapper Dangeruss, who appears alongside him. In truth, says Korine, Alien is an amalgamation of many people, mostly local types he was at school with. "But I never meant it to be a realistic portrayal," he says. "He's a gangster mystic, he's almost like an energy. It was never meant to be like a documentary about these types of characters. He has certain attributes, but he's also this kind of crazy poet. He's as close to Max Cady in Cape Fear as he is to Dangeruss."

'It was the first time I ever talked to Gucci Mane. I said: If you don't re-offend, I have a part for you when you get out. He was like: Don't worry, I'm not gonna fuck up'

Despite the sexually charged intensity of their scenes with him, the girls have spoken of how relaxed Franco made them feel, but compared to some of the people in the film, he would have been the least of their worries. Gucci Mane, the rapper who plays Alien's menacing nemesis, was in prison when Korine offered him the job. "I jumped on the phone with him, he had six months left," says the director. "It was the first time I ever talked to him and I said, 'If you don't re-offend, I have a part for you when you get out.' He was like, 'Don't worry, I'm not gonna fuck up.'"

This potpourri of fantasy and reality, celebration and satire, is a blast, and a very contemporary one. It's a sensory feast, with looped dialogue and distorted images, and a score by Drive's Cliff Martinez (woozy) and Skrillex (Skrillexy). It's a reflection on a generation, Korine says, raised on YouTube. Much of it plays like a Grand Theft Auto game, with about as much logic.

"Yeah. Well, I wanted it to be something closer to a video game, or something of a physical experience," he says. "The culture of surfaces, an almost post-articulate culture. There's obviously a message in its meaning and pathologies to the film and the characters, but I wanted it to all come from the residue and the bleed of the surface."

It looks gorgeous. Drawing from his Day-Glo research, Korine told his cinematographer he "wanted it to look like it was lit with candy. Like Skittles or Starburst. I wanted the tone to be pushed into a hyper-candy-textural, hyper-stylised reality." Some of the trippy visual effects, meanwhile, look like basic Photoshop techniques. Is that a nod to the way kids use computers today? "Yeah, it's all that," he says. "It's meant to be a kind of visual mash-up, or an impressionistic reinterpretation of all those things. I was trying to think of the medium in a different way, or in a way that was at least more inventive. Something that was closer to musical experiences I've had, electronic music, things that were loop-based and repetitive. There's not even a lot of dialogue; things are repeated in a way that a pop song has hooks. We were trying to obliterate the sense of time and go with something that was more like a feeling."

It is indeed seductive. It's a bold, unapologetic, entertaining film that reeks of its subject matter. Wade in.

Spring Breakers is out in the UK from Fri 5 Apr

Home / Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary / Luke / Chapter 15

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

"And not many days later, the younger son gathered everything together and went on a journey into a distant country, and there he squandered his estate with loose living.

Jump to: Clarke Commentary•Barne's Notes•Coffman Commentaries•Gill's Exposition•Commentary Critical and Explanatory•Lightfoot's Commentary•Robertson's Word Pictures•Vincent's Studies•Wesley's Notes•Fourfold Gospel•Abbott's New Testament•Trapp's Commentary•Sermon Bible•Coke's Commentary•Alford's Commentary•Bengel's Gnomon•Poole's Annotations•Cambridge Greek Testament•Whedon's Commentary•Pett's Bible Commentary•Schaff's New Testament Commentary•Expositor's Greek Testament•Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes•Commentary Critical and Explanatory - Unabridged•Ellicott's Commentary•Treasury of Knowledge

Adam Clarke Commentary

Not many days after - He probably hastened his departure for fear of the fine which he must have paid, and the reproach to which he must have been subjected, had the matter come before the civil magistrate. See above.

Riotous living - Ζων ασωτως, in a course of life that led him to spend all: from α not, and σωω I save. And this we are informed, Luke 15:30, was among harlots; the readiest way in the world to exhaust the body, debase the mind, ruin the soul, and destroy the substance.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Gathered all together - Collected his property. If he had received flocks or grain, he sold them and converted them into money. As soon as this arrangement had been made he left his father‘s house.

Took his journey - Went, or traveled.

Into a far country - A country far off from his father‘s house. He went probably to trade or to seek his fortune, and in his wanderings came at last to this dissipated place, where his property was soon expended.

Wasted his substance - Spent his property.

In riotous living - Literally, “Living without saving anything.” He lived extravagantly, and in the most dissolute company. See Luke 15:30. By his wandering away we may understand that sinners wander far away from God; that they fall into dissolute and wicked company; and that their wandering so far off is the reason why they fall into such company, and are so soon and so easily destroyed.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-15.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

And not many days after, the younger son gathered all together and took his journey into a far country; and there he wasted his substance with riotous living.

The undisciplined life of the younger son quickly resulted in the waste, extravagance, and sinful living recounted here. This scene of irresponsible youth wasting the inheritance assembled at such cost of tears and labor on the part of their ancestors is repeated again and again in every generation, by countless thousands of people.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-15.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And not many days after the younger son gathered all together,.... That his father had divided to him, all his goods and substance: as soon as a man has any internal substance, any considerable degree of natural knowledge, he immediately sets out from God, and employs it against him, in reasoning against him, against his being, his works, his providence, his purposes, his revelation, and will; as soon as a man has the exercise of his reason, as soon as he can think and speak, nay, as soon as he is born, he goes astray from God, speaking lies; and as soon as a wicked man has of this world, what his carnal heart desires, he is for living independent of God, and his providence; he is for gathering together all for himself, in order to spend it on his lusts, and at a distance from his father, the father of his mercies, of whom he is not mindful; and to whom he says, depart from me, having no regard to his worship and service, to his honour and glory, to his cause and interest:

and took his journey into a far country; which sets forth the state of alienation a sinner is in, while unconverted; he is afar off from God, from God the Father; from the presence of God, and communion with him: from the knowledge of God, and desire after it; from love to him, or fear of him; and from the life of God, or a living soberly, righteously, and godly; and from Christ, from the knowledge of him, from faith in him, love to him, fellowship with him, and subjection to his ordinances; and from the Spirit of God, and every thing that is spiritual; and from all that is good, from the law of God, and from the righteousness of it, and from righteous men:

and there wasted his substance in riotous living; his internal substance, his knowledge and understanding, even in natural things, and became brutish, and even like the beasts that perish; and his worldly substance in rioting and drunkenness, in chambering and wantonness, with harlots, as in Luke 15:30 whereby he was brought to a piece of bread, and to the want of it,


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-15.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

not many days — intoxicated with his new - found resources, and eager for the luxury of using them at Will.

a far country — beyond all danger of interference from home.

wasted, etc. — So long as it lasted, the inward monitor (Isaiah 55:2) would be silenced (Isaiah 9:10; Isaiah 57:10; Amos 4:6-10).

riotous living — (Luke 15:30), “with harlots.” Ah! but this reaches farther than the sensualist; for “in the deep symbolical language of Scripture fornication is the standing image of idolatry; they are in fact ever spoken of as one and the same sin, considered now in its fleshly, now in its spiritual aspect” (Jeremiah 3:1-15; Ezekiel 16:1-17:24) [Trench].


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

13. And not many days after the younger son gathered all together, and took his journey into a far country, and there wasted his substance with riotous living.

[He wasted his substance with riotous living.] Ought not this prodigal to be looked upon as that stubborn and rebellious son mentioned Deuteronomy 21:18? By no means, if we take the judgment of the Sanhedrim itself. For, according to the character that is given of a stubborn and rebellious son in Sanhedrim, cap. 8, where there is a set discourse upon that subject, there can hardly be such a one found in nature as he is there described. Unless he steal from his father and his mother, he is not such a son; unless he eat half a pound of flesh, and drink half a log of wine, he is not such a son. If his father or mother be lame or blind, he is not such a son, &c. Half a pound of flesh! It is told of Maximin, that "he drank frequently in one day a Capitoline bottle of wine, and ate forty pounds of flesh; or, as Cordus saith, threescore."


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-15.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Not many days after (μετ ου πολλας ημερας — met' ou pollas hēmeras). Literally, after not many days. Luke is fond of this idiom (Luke 7:6; Acts 1:5).

Took his journey (απεδημησεν — apedēmēsen). First aorist active indicative of αποδημεω — apodēmeō (from αποδημος — apodēmos away from home). Common verb. In the N.T. here and Matthew 21:33; Matthew 25:14; Mark 12:1; Luke 20:9. He burned all his bridges behind him, gathering together all that he had.Wasted (διεσκορπισεν — dieskorpisen). First aorist active indicative of διασκορπιζω — diaskorpizō a somewhat rare verb, the very opposite of “gathered together” (συναγογων — sunagogōn). More exactly he scattered his property. It is the word used of winnowing grain (Matthew 25:24).With riotous living (ζων ασωτως — zōn asōtōs). Living dissolutely or profligately. The late adverb ασωτως — asōtōs (only here in the N.T.) from the common adjective ασωτος — asōtos (α — a privative and σωζω — sōzō), one that cannot be saved, one who does not save, a spendthrift, an abandoned man, a profligate, a prodigal. He went the limit of sinful excesses. It makes sense taken actively or passively (prodigus or perditus), active probably here.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright � Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-15.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

All

Everything was taken out of the father's hands.

Took his journey ( ἀπεδήμησεν )

Answering to our phrasewent abroad.

Wasted ( διεσκόρπισεν )

The word used of winnowing grain. See on Matthew 25:24.

With riotous living ( ζῶν ἀσώτως )

Lit., living unsavingly. Only here in New Testament. The kindred noun, ἀσωτία , is rendered by the Rev., in all the three passages where it occurs, riot (Ephesians 5:18; Titus 1:6; 1 Peter 4:4). See note on the last passage.


Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-15.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He took a journey into a far country - Far from God: God was not in all his thoughts: And squandered away his substance - All the grace he had received.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-15.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And not many days after1, the younger son gathered all together and took his journey into a far country2; and there he wasted his substance with riotous living3.
  1. And not many days after. With all haste.
  2. The younger son gathered all together and took his journey into a far country. He yearned for the spurious liberty of a land where he would be wholly independent of his father. Thus the sinful soul seeks to escape from the authority of God.
  3. And there he wasted his substance with riotous living. Sin now indulges itself with unbridled license, and the parable depicts the sinner's course: (1) his season of indulgences (Luke 15:12,13); (2) his misery (Luke 15:14-16); (3) his repentance (Luke 15:17-20); (4) his forgiveness (Luke 15:20-24). On the phrase "riotus living", see Luke 15:20-24.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-15.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Gathered all together; the property of various kinds which his father had bestowed upon him.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-15.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

13 And not many days after the younger son gathered all together, and took his journey into a far country, and there wasted his substance with riotous living.

Ver. 13. Gathered all together] Convasatis veluti omnibus.

With riotous living] ασωτως{a} Not caring to save any part, sibi nihil reservaus, imo seipsum non servans, being such as safety itself could not save; whence the Latins call such a man perditum, an undone person. Such were those of whom Seneca saith, that singulis auribus bina aut terna dependent patrimonia, hanged two or three good lordships at their ears. And such are those among us that turn lands into laces, great rents into great ruffs, &c. The expenses of Apicus’ kitchen amounted to more than two millions of gold. {b} He having eaten up his estate, and finding by his account that he had no more than 200,000 crowns remaining, thought himself poor, and that this sufficed not to maintain his luxury; whereupon he drank down a glass of poison.

{a}ασωτοςquasiασωστος, unsavable.

{b}H. S. millies in culinam coniecisset.{Seneca, Moral Essays, l. 12. c. 10. (8-10) 2:453}


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-15.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 15:13

I. When principle is weak the far country is fatal. If any one is obliged to leave home—not from love of idleness, not from love of pleasure, not from love of liberty, but on such business as brings young men to our large towns every day—do not forget that God is here.

II. The portion of goods which fell to the prodigal must have been a handsome patrimony, and it would have been his wisdom to wait for it till the proper time. But with indecent haste he forestalled his reversion, and what he obtained so easily he quickly fooled away. Daily bread costs little, but dainties are dear, and are never so costly as when they are gifts from the devil.

J. Hamilton, Works, vol. ii., p. 287.


Riotous Living.

I. Pleasant as is the lot of our inheritance, it is well to remember that the thickets and steep places are haunted. Frightful ogres frequent them, and they are sure to sally forth on the heedless wanderer. The names of three of the best known are: The Lust of the Eye, the Lust of the Flesh, and the Pride of Life; or, as they are sometimes called—Vanity, or the love of display; Sensuality, or the love of low pleasure; and the Affectation of Fashion, or the keeping-up of appearances.

II. If you would pass innocently through a difficult world keep within the rules. Let your life be open, your eye single, your walk in the broad light of day. To the great temptations the great antidote is not a limited income so much as a large self-denial.

J. Hamilton, Works, vol. ii., p. 300.


References: Luke 15:13.—J. Bainton, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xix., p. 220; Ibid., vol. xxii., p. 220; Church of England Pulpit, vol. iii., p. 143.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-15.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 15:13. With riotous living.— The phrase Ζων ασωτωςimplies, that he lived in every degree of luxury and sensuality. The account before us is short.—The interesting and affecting passages with which sucha transaction would necessarily be connected, are left to be supplied by the heart. The story is silent,—but nature is not. Much kind advice, and many a tender expostulation would fall from the father's lips, no doubt, upon this occasion. He would dissuade his son from the folly of so rash an enterprize, by shewing him the dangers of the journey, the inexperience of his age, the hazards that his life, his fortune, his virtue would run, without a guide, without a friend: he would tell him of the many snares and temptations which he had to avoid or encounter, at every step; the pleasures which would solicit him; the little knowledge he could gain, except that of evil: he would speak of the seductions of women, their charms, their poisons; what hapless indulgencies he might give wayto, when far from restraint, and the check of giving his father pain.—The dissuasion would but inflame his desire.—He gathers all together. I see the picture of his departure; the camels and asses laden with his substance, detached on one side of the piece, and already on their way,—the prodigal son standing on the fore-ground, with a forced sedateness, strugglingagainst the fluttering movement of joy upon his deliverance from restraint:—the elder brother holding his hand, as if unwilling to let it go:—the father,—sadmoment!withafirmlook covering a prophetic sentiment, that "all would not go well with his child,"—approaching to embrace him, and bid him adieu.—Poor inconsiderate youth! from whose arms art thou flying? From what a shelter art thou going forth into the storm? art thou weary of a father's affection, or a father's care? or hopest thou to find a warmer interest, or truer counsellor, or kinder friend, in a land of strangers,—where youth are made a prey, and so many thousands are confederated to deceive them, and live by their spoils?


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-15.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

13.] μακράν—probably not adverbial (Stier), but agreeing with χώραν, see reff., and Æsch. Prom. 814: Xen. Cyr. ver. 4. 47: compare however ἔθνη μακράν, Acts 22:21.

The images of both the preceding parables are united here:—in ἀπεδήμησεν we have the straying sheep; in his state when he got into the far country, the lost piece of money. But in this case the search is to be carried on within him—we are now on higher ground than in those two parables.

‘Regio longinqua est oblivio Dei,’ Augustine. (Trench, in loc.)

ἀσώτως] The old English word retchlessly expresses perhaps best the meaning, which is not ‘unsparingly’ (in which sense of ‘saving money’ I doubt σώζω ever being used), but incorrigibly, past hope of reclaim:— ἄσωτος, ὁ διʼ αὑτὸν ἀπολλύμενος, Aristot. Eth. iv. 1.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-15.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 15:13. ἀσώτως) A word employed with great propriety. ἄσωτος, ὁδἰαὐτὸνἀπολλύμενος, i.e. one destroyed by himself, his own worst enemy; Aristot. b. iv. Eth. ch. 1, where ἀσωτία is excess of liberality conjoined with intemperance. [In this state, he was dead to his Fatherland, Luke 15:24.—V. g.]


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-15.html. 1897.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

13. μετ' οὐ πολλὰς ἡμέρας. This shadows forth the rapidity [1] of national, and [2] of individual degeneracy. “In some children,” says Sir Thomas Elyot in The Governour, “nature is more prone to vice than to vertue, and in the tender wìttes be sparkes of voluptuositie, whiche norished by any occasion or objecte, encrease often tymes into so terrible a fire, that therwithall vertue and reason is consumed.” The first sign of going wrong is yearning for spurious liberty.

ἀπεδήμησεν εἰς χώραν μακράν. Discedentes a se non prohibet, redeuntes complectitur, Maldonatus. The Gentiles soon became “afar off” from God (Acts 2:39; Ephesians 2:17), “aliens from the commonwealth of Israel, and strangers from the covenants of promise, having no hope, and without God in the world.” So too the individual soul, in its temptations and its guiltiness, ever tries in vain to escape from God (Psalms 139:7-10) into the ‘far country’ of sin, which involves forgetfulness of Him. Jer. Ep. 146. Thus the younger son becomes “Lord of himself, that heritage of woe.”

ζῶν ἀσώτως. Literally, ‘living ruinously’—perdite. The adverb occurs here only, and is derived from α, ‘not,’ and σώζω, ‘I save.’ The substantive occurs in 1 Peter 4:4; Ephesians 5:18. Aristotle defines ἀσωτία as a mixture of intemperance and prodigality. For the historical fact indicated, see Romans 1:19-32. The individual fact needs, alas! no illustration. One phrase—two words—is enough. Our loving Saviour does not dwell upon or darken the details of our sinfulness.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
"Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-15.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13.Not many days after—This son has set up for himself, just as man desires to be independent of God. And being so, his next purpose is a due distance, where the will of God shall never seem to reach him, and if possible beyond the reach of his eye.

Gathered all together—His means were now all in a movable form, not in real estate; and he was fully prepared for a profligate squander.

Riotous living—The word here rendered riotous is used both in Latin and Greek, and expresses the utmost abandonment of character, and is in fact the original of the English word “sot.”


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-15.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“And not many days after, the younger son gathered all together (or ‘turned it all into cash’) and took his journey into a far country, and there he wasted his substance with riotous living.”

After a period, we may assume with the agreement of his father, the son turned his portion into cash and went to a far country (far from the father). The idea was probably that there he would establish himself in business, and increase their fortune. It was quite a regular occurrence for Jews to go to the great cities for this purpose, and in doing so he would require capital, which explains the father’s willingness to allow him it.

But the son, once released from home, went to the bad. Instead of concentrating on business he gave himself up to a good time and the bright lights. He forgot his obligation to his father (who still had a right to the use and protection of the capital and to any income from it) and used the money to live extravagantly and immorally. It is very probable that the elder brother’s summary of his behaviour was very near to the truth (Luke 15:30).

This young man is a vivid representation of how large numbers live today. Like him they forget that it is God Who has given them their prosperity, and ignore His rights, and live totally to please themselves. They do not see themselves as having any responsibility towards the Father.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-15.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 15:13. Comp. Matthew 6:24. Since the proper use of wealth is for God, those who do not thus use it are slaves to Mammon. The last verse implies that wealth is not our own, this implies that when it is used as our own, the presumed owner not only does not own it, but himself belongs to it.—There is not a word here capable of a communistic interpretation. Our Lord speaks of wealth as ‘that which is least,’ modern socialism regards money as the true riches. In principle, practice, and result, the two systems are totally divergent Christianity is the service of God, socialism the service of mammon,—judged by its fruits, ‘earthly, sensual’ and devilish.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-15.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 15:13. μετʼοὐπολλὰςἡμέρας: to be joined to ἀπεδήμησεν: he went away as soon as possible, when he had had time to realise his property, in haste to escape into wild liberty or licence.— μακράν: the farther away the better.— ἀσώτως ( α pr. and σώζω, here only in N.T.), insalvably; the process of reckless waste, free rein given to every passion, must go on till nothing is left. This is what undisciplined freedom comes to.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-15.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

after. Greek meta. App-104. Referring to the rapidity of the fall of Israel.

took his journey = went abroad.

into. Greek. eis. App-104.

far country. Compare Acts 2:39. Ephesians 2:17.

substance = property. Same word as "goods" in Luke 15:12.

with riotous living = living ruinously. Greek. asotos. Occurs only here. The kindred noun (asotia) occurs only in Ephesians 5:18. Titus 1:6. 1 Peter 4:4.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And not many days after the younger son gathered all together, and took his journey into a far country, and there wasted his substance with riotous living.

And not many days after (intoxicated with his new-found resources, and eager for the luxury of using them at will), he took his journey into a far country - away from the paternal eye, beyond all danger rebuke or interference from home,

And there wasted his substance with riotous living , [ asootoos (Greek #811)] - or 'to the destroying of himself.' His brother's charge against him, that he had "devoured his father's living with harlots," shows what is meant, But ah! this reaches deeper than sensuality. Since the whole story is designed to set forth the degradation of our sonship, and the prostitution of our powers to purposes unworthy of our dignity and true destiny, we must understand the language as intended to express all that life of estrangement from God, self-seeking and low desire which are common, in different forms and degrees, to all who live "without God," who "have their portion in this life," who mind "earthly things." So long as his substance lasted, the inward monitor would be silenced, and the prodigal would take his ease, eat, drink, and be merry. At times, he would hear the whisper of expostulation, "Wherefore do ye spend money for that which is net bread, and your labour for that which satisfieth not?" (Isaiah 55:2). But though his means were fast fading, he would say to himself, "The bricks are fallen down, but we will build with hewn stones; the sycamores are cut down, but we will change them into cedars" (Isaiah 9:10). So long as anything remained, he would hold out, "Thou art wearied in the greatness of thy way: ye saidst thou not, There is no hope: thou hast found the life of thine hand: therefore thou wast not grieved" (Isaiah 57:10).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) Took his journey into a far country.—Such instances of emigration were, we may believe, familiar things in most towns of Galilee and Judæa. The young man left his home, and started, bent on pleasure or on gain, for Alexandria, or Rome, or Corinth, and rumour came home of riotous living, and a fortune wasted upon harlots, sabbaths broken, synagogues unvisited, perhaps even of participation in idol feasts. In the interpretation that lies below the surface, the “far country” is the state of the human spirit, of the Gentile world, in their wanderings far off from God. The “riotous living” is the reckless waste of noble gifts and highest energies on unbridled sensuality of life, or sensuous, i.e., idolatrous, forms of worship. The fearful history traced in Romans 1:19-32, is but too faithful a picture of the wanderings of the younger son.

Riotous.—The exact meaning of the word is prodigal, thriftless.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And not many days after the younger son gathered all together, and took his journey into a far country, and there wasted his substance with riotous living.
and took
2 Chronicles 33:1-10; Job 21:13-15; 22:17,18; Psalms 10:4-6; 73:27; Proverbs 27:8; Isaiah 1:4; 30:11; Jeremiah 2:5,13,17-19,31; Micah 6:3; Ephesians 2:13,17
wasted
30; 16:1,19; Proverbs 5:8-14; 6:26; 18:9; 21:17,20; 23:19-22; 28:7; 29:3; Ecclesiastes 11:9,10; Isaiah 22:13; 56:12; Amos 6:3-7; Romans 13:13,14; 1 Peter 4:3,4; 2 Peter 2:13

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 15:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-15.html.


One thought on “Riotous Living Definition Essay

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *